We need to talk about dogs


Now look. Dogs. Can someone please explain this to me: aren't they supposed to have better hearing than us? I very nearly got taken out by on four separate occasions by four different canines during my long run today, and I really don't think I'm so light on my feet (I wish) that I floated up to them at sub-canine hearing levels. Who needs iPhone zombies when you've got mutts distracted by specks of dust, or making a sudden dash for that fascinating patch of mud right under where your right foot is about to land?

Of course, they are only doing what dogs do, and I'll save any actual ire for dog owners who set up a nice little trip wire with one of those extendable leads across the busy bike/walk path. Or the woman who - I swear this actually happened - once shouted at me "MY DOG GOT HUMAN RIGHTS TOO!" when I protested about it jumping all over my terrified daughter. People eh? You ought to have a licence to, err, be one.

Saturday's weather was unspeakable, but the flip side of Sunday's cold-but-fine morning was that the embankment path along the river was as busy as is is during summer.

I've actually been avoiding my standard Sunday long run route for a while, just because repetition can be a bit soul destroying.  There are certain stretches of my north-along-the-river, south-side-back route that have become dark patches - however good I'm feeling, I suddenly hit a bad spot when I get to the bits that my brain tells me signal a bad spot. A self-fulfilling prophesy, in other words.

So by changing up your route, you can trick yourself out of such moments - at least that's my theory. It's much like switching from miles to kilometres: during a marathon, I often find the toughest point mentally (not physically) is about 16 miles. I suppose it's the combination of tiring legs with the knowledge that you still have 10 whole miles to go. Yet convert that to kilometres and you can half-trick yourself into not knowing when that point is. I mean, of COURSE I can work it out, but I try not to. Plus, after about mile 15 of a marathon, it takes me a good 10 minutes to add two and two, so if I did actually try and work it out, I'd have gone through the low and out the other side by the time I did.

I say long run: my long run was 'only' 13.5 miles so hardly much to write home about. But I've not done much over 10 or so miles for a while, and it's all relative. So all the mental tricks were employed, including the promise of a cold beer when it's all over. And with that in hand, and a busy day tomorrow, I'm writing the Monday Debrief on a Sunday night. But not to confuse you, I'll schedule it for tomorrow morning. By the time you read this I'll be, um, 12 hours older, and none the wiser. Share your stories, as always.



Comments

  1. I finally ran in an official race! The Tinsel 10k in Llanidloes, which turned out to be hillier and worse terrain than expected. On the plus side, the weather was as good as one could hope for in December in Wales, although Saturday's horrendous rain meant the ground was a mess and my feet were squelching in mud and ice-cold water the whole way round. The time was nothing to write home about but I'm pleased I've broken the duck and done an official race - it wasn't as scary as I feared, though perhaps that was helped by it being a nice small event.

    Thanks to you all for your encouragement and helping to keep my enthusiasm up. My OH helps too, but it's good to have another outlet for this sort of thing.

    My only remaining target for the year is to participate in a Parkrun (as I've mentioned before). I'm cutting it fine but perhaps this Saturday will be the day for me to do it. I won't hold my breath...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well done! Very impressive to do an off-road one for your first too - everything else will feel much easier.

      Delete
    2. Thanks! I did find myself saying, halfway round, "If this wasn't an effing official race, I'd have given up by now", and then telling my OH I'll be choosing the next race, which will most definitely be a flat road one. This was all around the time we realised we'd taken a wrong turn so the 10 km ended up, according to my watch, being 10.8 km.

      Delete
    3. Well done! And good luck at parkrun :-)

      Delete
    4. Bravo! It's a big undertaking to get out there the first time and so many unknowns to muddle through. Over time, the anxieties change but the thrill is always there as is the looking forward to the next one.

      Delete
    5. Well done! Can I humbly suggest trying the training plans you get if you download mapmyrun. I've used the app and recently the plan to do my first semi marathon. It helped me build up fitness levels without injury and was very motivating for me.

      Delete
  2. Luckily most of the dogs are very well-trained over here and so I don't have to worry, but I have been charged/ nearly tripped more than once by dogs, so I'm also cautious. It's a very interesting phenomenon because I love dogs in general, but as soon as I go on a run, I am suddenly imbued with a strong suspicion and wariness. The least favorite thing that's happened in recent months is a dog that was jumping on me because I wanted to play, during mile 16+ of a long run. Not the right time.

    The owners are usually the worst part. If your dog is charging someone/ barking at someone and the receiver of that aggression gets upset by it, the solution isn't to get tetchy. A wife of a colleague was once charged by a dog in a park near our work. She yelled, "geh weg, du schiacher Hund!", which translates to "get away from me, you ugly/terrible dog", and the owner apparently replied with something along the lines of "well, you're no Brooke Shields, either!". This was the subject of quite a bit of amusement, as this took place not in the 90s but a few years ago. So why Brooke Shields?

    My running this weekend was nice and uneventful. I've actually run the same route (with some modifications) for the last month, because I discovered a new one that I quite enjoy. I do plan to take a break from it this weekend though to avoid getting sick of it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Dogs, leads, falling over. The only one of those things not involved in my weekend running was leads. After a slightly lively pair of runs on Friday and a disrupted night's sleep I did a parkrun sandwich on Saturday morning. Just after halfway, I saw a dog, sans lead, bolt from one side of the path across behind me - it felt like it grazed my trailing heel. Around in 5th for a sub-18 in freezing conditions - pretty good going. With the drop in temperature, more of the course was runnable in road shoes, perhaps only 10% of the course was still slidey.

    On Sunday it was our club's AGM and awards evening, so I squeezed in an hour's run in the late afternoon, just after dark. I started off easily enough, getting into a nice rhythm going up the big hill of the route, then when I went down the other side of the hill I carried on at a decent clip. About a mile and a half into this quicker section I fell over - at greater than 10mph. My foot went into soft earth instead of pavement, I lost my balance and flew a few metres, landing mainly on my elbow, hip and knee. I stopped my watch, went back to confirm what I'd stepped into and after a passer-by checked I was OK, carried on - adrenaline got me home at the same pace. Only when I peeled off my jacket did I see the bloody mess of my arm. After getting cleaned up and a quick dinner I went to the club AGM. I was fortunate to pick up some silverware, including a cup for breaking the club's marathon record in September. I will probably have a couple of days off running while the bruising on my hip comes out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ouch, hope you're ok. I fell over a couple of weeks ago - unfortunately not on nice soft earth, and my knee is still a complete scabby mess. Hope it doesn't take you out for long.

      Delete
    2. Congrats on the award mate! Try to enjoy the couple of days rest ;-)

      Delete
    3. I think I've had worse falls while running than I have off of horses. Seriously, you just get slammed into the ground, no chance to get an arm out and tuck and roll. And then of course, you have to run home, which can be miles.

      Sympathies for the crash and congrats for the trophy haul!

      Delete
    4. Thank you! The kids were impressed with the trophy haul when they saw them this morning. I still can't quite believe that there was about a 3x1ft rectangle missing in the pavement. I was fairly lucky to be within 10 minutes of home, it could have been further.

      Delete
  4. Dogs - or rather their owners - don't even get me started. My 'favourite' story is the one where two dogs suddenly ran in front of my bike giving me no time to brake, so I flew over my handlebars. When I'd got myself together enough to pick myself up the owner gave me the finger. Nice.

    Anyway, on to cheerier things. I've had quite a couple of running high weeks. Last weekend I did my 'Leadership in running fitness' course, which means I'm now officially qualified to lead a group (no heckling from kyd at the back) and on the road to eventually qualifying as a coach if I feel the urge. Friday was our club Christmas party where I was presented with my HUGE shield for winning the cross country, PLUS the club's coveted 'golden buff' as club member of the month for my writing of the weekly race report. So that was a very nice haul to bring home.

    Yesterday I ran the Hooky Christmas Canter which is a fab 7ish miles off-roader in Oxfordshire with a lovely atmosphere. Everyone dresses up, and although I have an aversion to running in fancy dress I went as 'Jingle bells' (Christmas songs theme) and proceed to drive everyone crazy by the jiggling from a thousand tiny little bells I'd sewed on to my sleeves the night before. The mud was pretty epic, but it was better than the snow and freezing rain of last year, and I finished over 1.5 minutes quicker - a very satisfying end to this running year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like you're having a lot of fun and success with the club this year, well done, I'm impressed and you deserve it!!

      Delete
    2. Have you seen the Brooks Christmas running shoes that have jingles embedded somewhere in the tongue? OMG...
      https://www.runnersworld.co.uk/gear/shoes/brooks-christmas-levitate-2

      Delete
    3. Well thank GOD they are removable. Imagine running a marathon next to someone wearing bells on their shoes. I'd have murdered them by, oo, 10k?

      Delete
    4. Like running alongside a Morris Dancer!

      Delete
    5. What kind of psychopath invented those?

      @kyd thanks! Am feeling very full of the running joy at the moment - it's been quite a year all round.

      Delete
  5. Dogs were my issue a week ago, no problems this week though.

    Another week of easy miles, squeezed in around a work Christmas do, and a trip to glasgow for another night. Just getting everything done at this time of year is a major victory. At least Saturday was a planned day off, weather was horrible.
    Finally got my 10mile long run in late sunday afternoon. Felt nice and very easy.

    Wasn’t looking at my watch at all, managed to run 3 successive 8:20 minite miles. I think this might be a sign that I’m some kind of robot or replicant.

    Another christmas party combined with another round trip to Glasgow this week, and 40miles of running to be squeezed in, then some lovely time off.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I was a dreaded iphone (well, android) zombie this weekend. I almost jumped a foot in the air when another runner came from behind. To be fair, I don't think it's because I was deaf to my surroundings, but because it was so quiet out. The forecast was for frozen rain, but luckily it was more like normal rain and fairly light. Having missed my local club's end-of-year group run and pancake breakfast to work on my last ever class paper, I was keeping myself company listening to Mario Fraioli's latest podcast with Des Linden. Backed that up with an Australian one, Inside Running, which is an odd format - the long rambly type - but interesting because one of the hosts this week was Sinead Diver.

    I've been tentatively increasing my mileage for the last couple of weeks, and my knee seems to be holding up. Tomorrow I begin the looooong journey home for the holidays and I've already got an appointment booked with my physio for the morning after I arrive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This episode was recorded before Zapotek, and Sinead really downplayed her competitiveness! One second off a world champs qualifying time over the 10km - amazing.
      https://www.the42.ie/sinead-diver-australia-athletics-4395262-Dec2018/

      Delete
  7. Dogs and runners; now there's a calamity waiting to happen. My worst dog related incident was when a ridgeback tried to take a piece of my backside while I was running on the common. I assume he wasn't trying that hard as I got away with just a few red weals. The one small dog moment I had this weekend happened towards the end of my 20km run yesterday, when I was less than agile in both mind and body. It was a sort of slow motion pile up but fortunately no damage was done to either of us. No apologies from the owner of course.

    Like most, Saturday's parkrun weather was pure filth. I can't remember ever being wetter at the end of a run.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's funny you describing a slow motion pile up at the end of a 20k run .. that's exactly how it feels, I've narrowly avoided cars in the same manner, nothing is razor sharp but you can see it coming! Oxygen deprived brain.

      Delete
    2. Yep, it's always easier to judge how fast they're going (dogs, cars, other runners) and to adjust accordingly in the first 5kms than in the last 5.

      Delete
  8. Dogs are stupid. I have one, as you can see by my icon, and, yes, he is wearing a ski helmet and, yes, he's as thick as mince. I will only run with him on paths in woods where he disappears to look for things that smell, run away or he can roll in, however, he will invariably come at from the side I'm not expecting him to come from and hit my trailing leg. I try and avoid the general public. Although very friendly and affectionate other people don't know this so it is our responsibility, as dog owners, to be well behaved and show consideration. That's the dog owner in me. The runner in me gets really annoyed by extender leads. I have hurdled, tripped and berated my fellow owners for this. They are a menace and completely unnecessary. Short leads are all that is needed. One thing that helps as both a dog owner and runner is awareness. There's no harm in shouting "coming through" or "passing on your right" to warn a distracted dog owner, or dog.

    On the running front. I took a week and bit off and then did a short run on Friday and felt much better for the break. I think a few weeks of stress have taken their toll but now I am keen to get back to it and have signed up for the Anglesey Half in March to support my friend who has lost 3 and half stone this year and just taken up running. I'm inspired by his determination. Happy run up to Christmas, and happy running, everyone.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm yet to have a dog incident, but I know that in typing that I'm tempting fate. I just know I'll get savaged during tomorrow's run. Actually, I have the ideal dog for endurance running - a Siberian husky. People always ask if she goes running with me. The answer is 'no' as her constant stopping to sniff/wee/poo/play would just do my head in. They then ask if she could run with me off the lead. I have to explain to them that a husky is more lupine than canine and I would fear for the local sheep, cows, wild deer, etc!

    The weekend's running involved my 12th marathon+ distance run of the year on Saturday in abject conditions (42km with 1,233 metres of ascent). The first two hours were relatively OK. Yes, it was freezing cold with a biting wind, but at least it was dry. Then, the rain started and this made each kilometre seem like a mile and every climb became a relentless slog. I got home after four hours in those conditions and I looked a sight. I'd thawed out enough by Sunday morning to do a very gentle 8km. I've got about 25km to do to make it 4,000km for the year. I'll meet this distance target by Wednesday, but I think I'll fall tantalisingly short of meeting my elevation gain target of 140,000 metres (137,000 metres). All the best for Christmas and the new year everyone!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm surprised you've never come across feral dogs in Spain. Perhaps you just run too high and too far for them to follow. Running on Saturday was a brave thing to do - I seriously considered a dns for the first time in years for my Sunday race if the weather was going to be similar.

      Delete
    2. Mark, I saw this and thought of you...

      http://www.ultratrailwales.com/

      Rather than assume anything, I thought I'd post it in case you weren't aware of it.

      Delete
  10. No dogs, no running, no swimming, no riding, no fun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ... and no partridge in a pear tree.
      Sounds rubbish min.

      Delete
    2. Planks, Asta? Isn't that exercise? No, can't do that either!

      Delete
    3. Eat some mince pies instead?

      Delete
    4. Apparently the average Brit eats 27 (TWENTY SEVEN) during Christmas.

      Cannot stand them myself.

      Delete
    5. Mince pies? Still a no!

      So, what happened? About 12 days ago I got a viral infection that resulted in a mouth/tongue/gums covered in ulcers. Very, very painful. It is the cold sore virus (herpes simplex). Then it developed into skin lesions on my face.
      It is due to being run down/fatigued. So, it's a steady recovery with an idea of getting back to everything in the new year if all goes well.

      Delete
    6. Ah shit Pete, sorry to hear that.

      Turn your brain off for as long as it takes and eat/drink what the hell you want/can.

      Delete
    7. Sorry to hear that Pete. Put your feet up and indulge in food, booze, and rubbish telly til the New Year. You deserve it!

      Delete
    8. Ouch! Poor Pete. Hope you can get some good rest in over the holidays and also make up for the ulcers with some fantastic meals.

      Delete
    9. Ouch. I suffer from garden-variety cold sores a few times a year and those are bad enough. Can't imagine the pain and annoyance of having them on your tongue. I hope you will be healed up soon!

      Delete
    10. oh no, I used to suffer terribly with Herpes Simplex as a teenager. If the mouth/tongue/throat ulcers weren't painful enough, I could cope better with those than the ugly cold sores I got on my face and nose. That's excruciating for an image conscious teen! It was definitely due to being run down, I wasn't looked after : ( When I went to my nan's she'd give me Minadex Tonic to help build me up but the horse had well and truly bolted and wasn't coming back anytime soon.

      Think of all the making up for eating and exercise you can do when recovered, it must be on the horizon. I feel for you Pete.

      Delete
    11. Thanks everyone. Saw my dentist this morning, the 4th time in 9 days. He told me, now that things are improving, that in over 40 years of practice he had never seen a primary infection of herpes simplex in the mouth and was a bit concerned! I told him "so was I". He gave me some advice about training for the triathlon in May 2019 and told me generally to take it easy for a while.
      I winced when I read about your experiences with the virus osmenog. That sounds grim.
      Actually, when the lesions started to appear kyd, I didn't care because it was so painful, but I've become more aware and conscious of them. Luckily, I've just decided to let my beard grow longer!

      The average brit eats 27 mince pies? Really Asta? Some one must be putting my share away as I'm not a fan.

      Delete
  11. They dont let dogs in the gym so I'm safe!

    More running, no trees pulled up but solid incremental improvement. 20k@4.30 with a head cold was encouraging. As was increasing the load on the leg press machine to 100kg (right leg only). Most impressive of all (hey, it's relative), I hopped up all nine steps of the gym...back in September I could barely manage one.

    Derby v Forest on TV tonight and parties Tuesday and Thursday so this week might be easier (in terms of distance and pace and steps hopped) than last.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'Derby v Forest on TV tonight'. So that's why my husband said he'd be home early...

      Delete
    2. hahaha! Two hours until kick-off and the wine is opened!

      Delete
    3. I'll be watching Southport v Tranmere in the FA CUP 2nd round replay. I grew up watching Tranmere and still havel a soft spot for them.

      Delete
    4. I'd like to cheer on Tranmere with you Pete but I hate John Aldridge.

      Delete
    5. Wondering what John Aldridge ever did to you Asta? I have visions of mental scars and nightmares.
      On a positive note, the win lat night means that Tranmere have got Spurs at home in the 3rd round of the FA CUP. Might try and get tickets.

      Delete
  12. Saturday was meant to be 4 miles and Sunday 10km (got to love jumping between Imperial and metric depending on the distance...) but the weather was so bad that I binned Saturday run.

    Did 10 miles on Sunday instead, relaxed pace and just ticked off the miles. Only problem was the cold meant I didn't notice the seam of my short rubbing against my legs. Worst chaffing in a long time! It looked a bit like a Christmas Tree (if you really squinted), very festive!

    ReplyDelete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Let's take the dogs' perspective...

    WTF is up with these lycra-clad humans who plug their ears with music, then run through the park panting like, well, dogs and curiously lack the wherewithal to avoid other park users?

    But becoming human again, I'll say that retractable leads are just plain dangerous. This is actually the consensus in the dog training community and their use is highly discouraged. I was once at a party where three men had their arms in casts from incidents with their dogs on retractable lead. All three of these guys were physicians, so go figure.

    My own dog has impeccable manners but thinks running is a waste of time that would be better spent on the couch with a dog.

    My week and weekend's running consisted of consistent 60 minute runs at HR pace, either on the treadmill or at the local arboretum if the weather was decent. I'm trying to add more volume which isn't easy because I lose personal volume very easily and need a fair amount of strength in other aspects of my life. This week I plan to add two sessions of 8 20-second all-out sprints, Tabata-style. I started doing this a couple of months ago but then bruised my foot on an uneven concrete seam and needed to let that heal.

    On Saturday, there's a trail race. It's one of my favorites, with a thigh-deep stream crossing near the finish. Last year, the creek was chest-deep so the race was rerouted, which was disappointing, although potential drownings were averted.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thigh deep? That sounds COLD!!!

      Delete
    2. When you first launch in, you think 'ok, this isn't too bad.' Then a few more steps and it hits you - 'this is effing COLD!' and you hustle out and scramble up the slippery, muddy bank. You can see the finish line from there.

      Once clear of the creek, the deep freeze really sets in. The bones in your feet hurt.

      The first year I did this, I vowed that if I ever returned to this race, I'd have a change of clothes in the car. The soaked drive home was no fun.

      Delete
  15. Hi everyone - I've been off travelling for the last few weeks (Antarctica, via Argentina - https://adobe.ly/2EwEYpn - how I wish I was still there...), and we certainly came across a lot of dogs while out running in Ushuaia (southern-most city in Argentina, well, the world actually) - they were just everywhere in the streets. Mostly well behaved, but a couple of larger scary ones ran up to us barking like crazy, I did NOT care for that at all!

    My running while travelling has been mostly of the minimal sort - doing 2k on a treadmill while holding on for dear life in 5m+ swells while crossing the Drake Passage was certainly an "interesting" running experience! I generally hate treadmill runs because of the monotony, but when the treadmill (and entire ship) is moving several metres up and down with each footstep, it kinda makes it a bit more interesting!

    Returning to normal life, the now-nearly-a-year running streak continues - although it nearly came to an abrupt end on Saturday when I plain forgot to go out. It was 23:43 and I mentioned to my partner "Oh, I haven't done my French for today" and she, thankfully, misheard me and said "You need to get out there now!!". So a hasty change-and-sprint-2k, just getting it in before midnight...

    I'm kinda struggling in general to get any motivation to do any substantial running at the moment, if I'm honest. The run streak is, at least, keeping me going out and doing a bit, just need to get the bug back for some longer / faster runs. It'll return, I know, I've been here before... post holiday blues.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. looks amazing...where were the green bits?

      Delete
    2. I got bitten by an Alsatian in Ushuaia! Very scary and my limited Spanish and the doctor's limited English meant it was a comical dialogue of me fretting about rabies and her about tetanus. Thankfully, I'd had my booster and there's no rabies there... But if anyone reading this is heading there, I recommend carrying a stick.

      Delete
    3. Asta - if by the green bits you're referring to this bit (https://lightroom.adobe.com/shares/11f4c386e7c94c208870aa407837ed15/albums/5e329315b16dc8819590fe75795f60bc/assets/369106ddadfc08242eea5f11c19c2744) then that was a place called Brown Bluff, actually on mainland continental Antarctica (the other landings in the photos were on islands).

      Rosie: I'm glad I didn't know that before I went!! Yikes!! I /always/ think dogs are going to bite me but assumed they were actually safe. Hope it wasn't too serious!

      Delete
  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  17. A week late for my marathon report - I didn't have access to my PC last week and for some reason my iPad wouldn't let me post.

    Right! The Miyazaki Marathon! Pretty rubbish again, all told... I'm obviously not very good at full marathons.

    There were a couple of pre-race mishaps: first of all, on the flight from Fukuoka to Miyazaki I suddenly realised I had forgotten all my gels, so I jumped into a taxi at the airport, directed the driver to take me to the nearest sport shop, and luckily found almost exactly the same brands as I usually use. I also slept really badly both the night before the trip to Kyushu and the night before the race. And thirdly, I way overdid carb-loading: I ate curry and rice for breakfast in Fukuoka airport, an amazing bowl of udon for lunch in Miyazaki, and then decided that wasn't enough and ordered pizza and chips from my hotel room service for dinner. Instant indigestion...

    Nevertheless, I felt OK on the morning of the race - organisation was great, atmosphere was great, everything went smoothly, I positioned myself about half way down the 4-5 hour block, decided to listen to music after all as about half the runners had earphones in, and set off feeling excited.

    On reflection, I think what happened was I panicked a bit after the first km - the crush was so bad that it took me 8 minutes, and although I was able to speed up after that, I felt I should push the pace a bit to make up for it, so I kept steady at around 6 minutes per km, when really I should have stayed at 6:15-6:20.

    The first half was fantastic - there was a bit where they had organised four lanes of runners, all running in alternate directions, which was amazing - and my music kept me going to 30km (although one earphone conked out, which put me off a bit), but I knew by that point there was no way I had enough left in the tank for another 12km, and sure enough, at 32km, I hit the wall badly, suddenly capable of only the slowest hobble. I sped up a bit after that, managed to run another km and a half along the beach (not actually on the sand, but close enough), then slowed down again. Around 40km a bloke on a bike came around, asking all the walkers if they were OK, but when he looked at me he didn't say anything. It may simply have been foreigner fear (it's very much a thing here), but it made me think I can't have been looking all that bad, so I managed to shuffle-run over the finish line in 4:49, about half an hour slower than I'd hoped.

    I wasn't too down about it, to be honest, and the event itself was so enjoyable. The support was fantastic - by far the best I've ever seen in Japan - with hundreds of volunteer schoolkids cheering and loads of locals who had come along with boiled sweets, pieces of peeled satsuma, water and coke, and cold spray for the legs to dish out to whoever wanted them. Miyazaki is quite isolated, which means they don't get to see many white faces, so all the kids went crazy whenever I passed. It all made me fall in love with my adopted country all over again.

    On Strava I wrote "Read my lips: NO MORE MARATHONS", but I might do another one at some point, because this time around I enjoyed most of the training and also most of the race itself. Before that, though, are two parkruns in Darlo and one in Novosibirsk (which is temperature dependent - I figure I'll do it as long as it's under minus 15).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well done TD, great effort. I guess when, after all the other things that didn't quite go to plan, to top it all you then lose an earphone, you just kinda know it's not meant to be...

      Delete
    2. Cheers Paul. It was really annoying - I have weird ears and go through earphones at a rate of knots. No idea why.

      Delete
    3. I saw the words 'Miyazaki Marathon' and I got all excited, expecting a magical tale of a 26.2 mile footrace in which you'd be shuttled to the start in a Catbus, cheered on by assorted Studio Ghibli characters like No Face, Totoro, Nausicaa and perhaps even thwarted by Lady Eboshi. That would be my kind of marathon.

      But even without Totoro and co, the race sounded like a good day out. (Of course, I say that partly because I love Kyushu ramen so my mind went very quickly to what I'd be eating after the race.)

      Delete
    4. Congrats TD - it's so hard to rein oneself in at the start of a marathon, so easy to overdo it. Still, to enjoy the first 30km is a major success in my books! Far better than my last proper marathon where I was overcooked by 10k, that was a long, hard slog to the finish line after that...

      Delete
    5. Congrats on the marathon! Sounds like it went pretty all right and that you've learned some things for next time :)

      Delete
    6. Thanks guys. As much as I would love a Ghibli marathon, Miyazaki is one of those cities that time forgot. Dead as a dodo, sadly, despite the good atmosphere on the day of the marathon itself. Fukuoka, on the other hand, I loved - it had a real buzz about it and the Hakata ramen were amazing.

      Delete
    7. Well done TD. Glad you manage a shuffle-run for the cameras. Sounds like a good day even with those last 10kms.

      Delete
  18. And as for dogs, I utterly adore them and have one of my own, but I can never understand the weird insistence of British dog owners that their dogs must be allowed to roam free wherever they want while being under no obligation whatsoever to train the bloody things. Here in Japan, the vast majority of dog owners are utterly, hilariously clueless about training their pooches (owning dogs as pampered pets rather than simply property guards being a relatively new concept), but it doesn't matter because on-lead laws are so strict that their untrained mutts can't cause any trouble. Meanwhile, the powers-that-be kindly provide dog runs in most parks, where you can let your dogs run free and argue with other dog owners to your heart's content. It all works out rather well.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Oh, and of course I meant above minus 15, not below...

    ReplyDelete
  20. I have the perfect dog. He is friendly, well behaved and never gets under anyone's feet or wheels, nor jumps up at small children or frightened adults. He has loved being a running dog. But, sadly, he is getting old. A couple of miles in now, he gets a bit weary and asks if we can slow down. And he had a life-threatening collapsed lung earlier this year, so I'm quite careful with him now. But the baleful look in his big brown eyes as I set off on a run without him breaks my heart! Long live the dogs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That look that says "you're going without me?" is heart wrenching, whether it be to get something out of the car or going out for the day. One for the dog owners but I know what you mean.

      Delete
  21. I desperately want a dog to run with but being a renter, I'm just going to have to pet other people's dogs for the next few years.

    This weekend's running started off with a very cold parkrun in Stretford before embarking on a 11 mile long run along the Salford canals on Sunday (I will be running the Brighton marathon in the spring). I nearly got knocked over by a dog chasing a goose (owner very apologetic though) and realised I should probably start bringing water on my longer runs! I rewarded myself by watching RuPaul's Drag Race in the bath.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Late again. Really must remember to visit on a Monday...

    Back to some normal mileage last week - 36 miles in total, with a "long" run of 12 of Sunday. Oddly have found the midweek efforts easier than the weekend ones as it's usually the other way around. But I'm starting to see some improvement and am (almost) looking forward to some faster-paced work this week.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I've had mixed experience with dogs. Most that I come across just look at me with a 'is that as fast as you can go' expression on their face and wander off in disgust. The worst incidents was with a Rottweiler who was chasing a cyclist but gave up as it couldn't catch them, so chased me instead. I just stood still and pointed away from me saying 'Go' as firmly as I could, which it did, to my surprise. The other incident, I was on my bike, when a farmer was trying to get his pack of hounds from his farm into the opposite field. They took one look at me on my bike and gave chase. I was met by another farm coming in the direction I was pedalling, shouting 'Don't let them get in your spokes!'......bless him, he was concerned about my bike (not!).

    Oh. yeah..weekend running...park run; couldn't be arsed..Sunday run, ran, skated and teetered along icy patches for an easy 10k.

    ReplyDelete
  24. It was really insightful.
    Thanks for the info.
    Wanna have more contents from you.
    Cheers
    BTW if anyone interested more have a look Read More thanks

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The fight for equality in cross country continues

Welcome to the brave new world

Kudos and The Running Channel